Sectional Qualifying: What to Watch For
June 02, 2017 By USGA
2011 PGA Championship winner Keegan Bradley finished tied for fourth in the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2

Big Canyon Country Club & Newport Beach Country Club     
Newport Beach, Calif.; 103 players for 5 spots  (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Shintaro Ban, 21, of San Jose, Calif., won the 2016 California State Amateur one year after his older brother, Shotaro, accomplished the same feat. Shintaro helped the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) win the 2017 NCAA West Lafayette Regional and Mountain West Conference titles. Ban, an All-West Region and All-MWC selection, competed in the 2013 U.S. Amateur. Shotaro was an All-Pac-12 Conference performer at the University of California-Berkeley.
  • Charlie Beljan, 32, of Mesa, Ariz., has played in three U.S. Opens, including a tie for 18th in 2015 at Chambers Bay. He started his professional career on the Gateway Tour and earned his PGA Tour card in 2012. Beljan won the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals Classic later that year. In 2002, he claimed the U.S. Junior Amateur title, defeating Zac Reynolds in 20 holes.
  • David Berganio Jr., 48, of Granada Hills, Calif., has played in six U.S. Opens. His best finish was a tie for 16th in 1996. Berganio, a two-time U.S. Amateur Public Links champion, advanced to the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2 through both qualifying stages and tied for 28th. Berganio, who was a University of Arizona teammate of 2003 U.S. Open champion Jim Furyk, was provided his first set of clubs by a local priest.
  • Sean Crocker, 20, of Long Beach, Calif., earned All-Pac-12 Conference honors, including his second first-team selection, for the third consecutive year. He tied for second at the NCAA Washington Region and led the University of Southern California to the team title. Crocker, who was born in Zimbabwe, learned the game from his father Gary, a professional cricket player. He made it to the 2015 U.S. Amateur semifinals and reached the quarterfinals of the 2014 U.S. Junior Amateur.
  • Aaron Dexheimer, 36, of San Diego, Calif., is a commercial salmon fisherman in Alaska during the summer and a caddie at Del Mar Country Club in the winter. He grinded on mini-tours for more than a decade before taking over his father’s fishing operation.
  • Allen Geiberger Jr., 29, of Palm Desert, Calif., is the son of Al Geiberger, who played in 20 U.S. Opens and tied for second in 1969 and 1976. Al Geiberger, the 1966 PGA champion, became the first player to shoot 59 in a PGA Tour event, the 1977 Danny Thomas Memphis Classic.
  • Paul Goydos, 52, of Coto de Caza, Calif., has competed in 10 U.S. Opens. His best finish was a tie for 12th in 1999 at Pinehurst No. 2. Goydos has two PGA Tour and four PGA Tour Champions wins, including last year’s Charles Schwab Cup Championship. He began his career on mini-tours and supplemented his income as a substitute teacher.
  • Stewart Hagestad, 26, of Newport Beach, Calif., won the 2016 U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship by defeating Scott Harvey in 37 holes. He produced the largest comeback victory (4 down with 5 holes to play) since a 36-hole Mid-Amateur final was introduced in 2001. Hagestad, the 2016 Metropolitan Golf Association Player of the Year, was the low amateur (tie, 36th) in the 2017 Masters Tournament.
  • Max Homa, 26, of Corona del Mar, Calif., is attempting to qualify for his second U.S. Open, having played in 2013 at Merion Golf Club. Homa, an All-American at the University of California-Berkeley and a member of the 2013 USA Walker Cup Team, has won twice on the Web.com Tour. He reached the quarterfinals of the 2010 U.S. Amateur.
  • Beau Hossler, 22, of Dallas, Texas, is attempting to qualify for his fourth U.S. Open. He shot a 4-under 68 in the Houston, Texas, local qualifier to advance to sectional play. Hossler, an All-American and two-time Big 12 Conference Player of the Year at the University of Texas, played in the 2011 U.S. Open at age 16 and tied for 29th in 2012. He has competed in 11 USGA championships and was a member of the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team.
  • Cheng Jin, 19, of the People’s Republic of China, earned Pac-12 Conference All-Freshman recognition and helped the University of Southern California win the NCAA Washington Regional. He won the 2015 Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship and earned an invitation to the 2016 Masters, where he missed the cut. He has played in two U.S. Amateurs and three U.S. Junior Amateurs.
  • Jake Knapp, 23, of Costa Mesa, Calif., competed in the 2015 U.S. Open after qualifying through the local and sectional levels. Knapp, who played at UCLA, was the medalist in the Mackenzie Tour-PGA Tour Canada Q-School at San Jacinto, Calif., in March. He shot a 61 at Newport Beach Country Club in 2012 U.S. Open local qualifying. Knapp reached the Round of 16 in the 2015 U.S. Amateur.
  • Edwin Kuang, 15, of Murrieta, Calif., was the second-youngest competitor in last year’s U.S. Amateur Championship at Oakland Hills Country Club. He shot a 69 to earn co-medalist honors in U.S. Open local qualifying at Andalusia Country Club, in La Quinta, Calif. Kuang is a sophomore on the Murrieta Valley High School team.
  • Gregor Main, 27, of Danville, Calif., advanced to his first U.S. Open through both local and sectional qualifying last year. Main, a third-team All-American at UCLA, was the stroke-play medalist in the 2011 U.S. Amateur at Erin Hills.
  • Scott McCarron, 51, of La Quinta, Calif., spent four years working in the family clothing business after playing as a collegian at UCLA. He returned to golf in 1992 and won three times on the PGA Tour. He later worked for Golf Channel and Fox as a broadcaster. He has won three PGA Tour Champions events since June 2016. McCarron has played in six U.S. Opens.
  • Danny Ochoa, 22, of Carlsbad, Calif., miscalculated a jump on his motocross bike eight years ago and broke his humerus bone after his bike landed on top of him. Two metal rods were placed in his left arm, and he was looking at a year of recovery. Ochoa, who is a fifth-year senior on the University of Southern California team, returned in seven months and later placed fifth at the 2010 Callaway Junior World Golf Championships.
  • Justin Suh, 19, of San Jose, Calif., helped the University of Southern California win the NCAA Washington Regional. Suh, a sophomore, was selected All-Pac-12 Conference first team. He qualified for the U.S. Open and advanced to match play in the U.S. Amateur last year. Suh reached match play in four consecutive U.S. Junior Amateurs, from 2011-14. His sister, Hannah, played in the 2013 U.S. Women’s Open.
  • Jonah Texeira, 21, of Los Angeles, Calif., advanced to the semifinals of the 2016 U.S. Amateur Championship, losing to Brad Dalke, 3 and 2. Texeira, a junior on the University of Southern California team, helped the Trojans win this year’s NCAA Washington Regional. He earned All-Pac-12 Conference honors for the second consecutive year. His sister, Keana, is a pop singer.
  • Sahith Theegala, 19, of Chino Hills, Calif., reached the quarterfinals of the 2016 U.S. Amateur, losing to eventual champion Curtis Luck, 2 up. Theegala, a sophomore on the Pepperdine University squad, was chosen West Coast Conference Co-Player of the Year and earned first-team All-WCC honors for the second consecutive year in 2017. In February, Theegala won the Collegiate Showcase to earn a spot in the PGA Tour’s Genesis Open and went on to tie for 49th.
  • Duffy Waldorf, 54, of New Smyrna Beach, Fla., has competed in 13 U.S. Opens, including a tie for ninth in 1994 at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. He has won four PGA Tour events and twice on PGA Tour Champions. He received his nickname Duffy from his grandparents. He tagged along on the golf course and they called him “Little Duffer.”

Jupiter Hills Club (Hills Course)
Tequesta, Fla.; 49 players for 3 spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Tyson Alexander, 28, of Gainesville, Fla., is the third of three generations of U.S. Open competitors. His grandfather, Skip, played in six U.S. Opens, including an 11th-place finish in 1948. His father, Buddy, won the 1986 U.S. Amateur and competed in two U.S. Opens (1987, 1994). Tyson, who plays on PGA Tour Latinoamerica, qualified for the 2009 U.S. Open at Bethpage State Park through local and sectional play.
  • Robert Allenby, 45, of Australia, has played in 15 U.S. Opens and has four top-25 finishes. His best performance is a tie for seventh in 2004. He has four wins on both the PGA Tour and PGA European Tour. Allenby has also won four Australian PGA Championships.
  • Canon Claycomb, 15, of Orlando, Fla., is one of five 15-year-olds in U.S. Open sectional qualifying. He splits time between Bowling Green, Ky., and Florida. He has played on the Greenwood High School team in Bowling Green since fourth grade. He led the team to a second-place finish at the KHSAA state championship last October when he tied for second. Claycomb won the 2015 Teen World Championship at Pinehurst No. 8 with a 54-hole score of 8-under 208.
  • Eugene Hong, 17, of Orlando, Fla., advanced to the semifinal round of the U.S. Junior Amateur Championship in both 2015 and 2016. He lost to eventual champion Min Woo Lee, 1 up, last year. Hong, who is a junior at Circle Christian School, won the 2016 FHSAA State Class 1A Championship and was the runner-up in 2014. He was also the runner-up in the 2015 FSGA Boys’ Junior (ages 13-15).
  • Sam Horsfield, 20, of England, has played in 13 USGA championships, including the 2015 and 2016 U.S. Opens. Horsfield, who announced on May 22 that he was turning professional, reached the Round of 16 in last year’s U.S. Amateur. A two-time All-Southeastern Conference selection at the University of Florida, Horsfield was chosen first-team All-American and SEC Freshman of the Year in 2016.
  • Fredrik Jacobson, 42, of Sweden, has competed in six U.S. Opens, with his best finish a tie for third at Olympia Fields (Ill.) Country Club in 2003. Jacobson has recorded one PGA Tour victory, the 2011 Travelers Championship, and three PGA European Tour wins.
  • Jack Maguire, 22, of St. Petersburg, Fla., is playing on the Web.com Tour for the second consecutive year. He made his professional debut at the PGA Tour’s 2016 Phoenix Open where he made a hole-in-one in the second round. He was an All-Atlantic Coast Conference performer for Florida State University. Maguire tied for 58th in the 2015 U.S. Open at Chambers Bay.
  • Joaquin Niemann, 18, of Chile, rose to No. 1 in the World Amateur Golf Ranking™ this spring. He won the Junior Invitational at Sage Valley and the AJGA Sergio Garcia Foundation Junior. Niemann also tied for second in the 2017 Latin America Amateur Championship, losing on the second playoff hole. Niemann advanced to the Round of 16 in the 2016 U.S. Amateur and the Round of 32 in last year’s U.S. Junior Amateur.
  • Alejandro Tosti, 21, of Argentina, won the 2017 Southeastern Conference individual title in a playoff as a member of the University of Florida team. Tosti, who earned first-team All-SEC recognition, shot 10-under 200 for 54 holes. He was the runner-up in the 2015 Latin America Amateur and finished seventh at the 2015 Pan American Games. Tosti has also competed in two World Amateur Team Championships. He tied for second individually in the 2014 WATC, three strokes behind Spain’s Jon Rahm.
  • Andy Zhang, 19, of the People’s Republic of China, was selected to the 2017 Southeastern Conference All-Freshman Team in his first year at the University of Florida. In 2012, he became the youngest player (age 14) to play in the U.S. Open, held at The Olympic Club. He also competed in the U.S. Amateur and European Masters. Zhang reached match play in all four U.S. Junior Amateurs in which he played, advancing to the quarterfinals in 2014.

Hawks Ridge Golf Club
Ball Ground, Ga.; 36 players for 2 spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Akshay Bhatia, 15, of Wake Forest, N.C., competed in the inaugural Drive, Chip & Putt Championship at Augusta National Golf Club at age 12 in 2014. He and partner Grayson Wotnosky qualified for this year’s U.S. Amateur Four-Ball and advanced to match play. Bhatia, who is home-schooled, finished seventh in the 2016 North Carolina Amateur. His older sister, Rhea, is a sophomore on the Queens University of Charlotte golf team.
  • Davis Love IV, 23, of Sea Island, Ga., shot 69 at the Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., local qualifier to advance. Love, known as Dru, is a fifth-year senior at the University of Alabama. He played in two spring events after missing the fall season due to injury. His father, Davis III, has competed in 23 U.S. Opens and is attempting to qualify in the Columbus, Ohio, sectional.
  • William Rainey, 21, of Charlotte, N.C., has impressed as the 2017 Colonial Athletic Association’s top player, but the College of Charleston senior’s trick shots have stolen the show. Rainey’s videos, available on Vine, have more than 3,000 followers. He was one of eight players to advance from the Newnan, Ga., local qualifier. Rainey and David Kocher lost to eventual champions Frankie Capan and Shuai Ming Wong, 1 up, in the quarterfinal round of last week’s U.S. Amateur Four-Ball.
  • Alex Smalley, 20, of Wake Forest, N.C., was the stroke-play medalist and advanced to the Round of 32 in the 2016 U.S. Amateur. Smalley, a sophomore at Duke University, helped the Blue Devils to the 2017 Atlantic Coast Conference Championship. He tied for fifth at ACCs and earned first-team all-conference and all-region recognition. He reached match play in the 2014 U.S. Junior Amateur.
  • Todd White, 49, of Spartanburg, S.C., won the 2015 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championship with partner Nathan Smith and was a member of the winning 2013 USA Walker Cup Team. White has competed in 22 USGA championships, including seven U.S. Amateurs and six Mid-Amateurs. The high school history teacher played in the 1995 U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club.
     

Woodmont Country Club (North Course)
Rockville, Md.; 50 players for 3 spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Frank Adams III, 38, of Salisbury, N.C., advanced through local and sectional qualifying to his first U.S. Open last year at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. Primarily a mini-tour player, Adams has won eight times on the eGolf Tour. His brother, Russ, who served as Frank’s caddie at last year’s U.S. Open, was taken in the first round of the MLB Draft by the Toronto Blue Jays and was an infielder in the organization, from 2004-09. He currently competes on mini-tours.
  • Shane Bertsch, 47, of Parker, Colo., is attempting to qualify for the U.S. Open through local and sectional play for the second time. He accomplished the feat in 1998 and played at The Olympic Club. Bertsch, who also competed in the 2012 U.S. Open and owns three Web.com Tour victories, was a top-tier junior tennis player and once competed against Andre Agassi.
  • Michael Brennan, 15, of Leesburg, Va., is the youngest player in 2017 U.S. Open sectional qualifying (born 2-9-02). As a freshman on the Tuscarora High School team, he finished fifth in the Virginia 5A State Championship and was the medalist at the Conference 14 and 5A North Region tournaments. Brennan qualified for last year’s Virginia State Amateur.
  • Chad Collins, 38, of Cloverdale, Ind., has played in two U.S. Opens, tying for 40th in 2014 at Pinehurst No. 2. Collins has played on the PGA, Nationwide, Web.com and NGA Hooters tours. He won twice on the Nationwide Tour (now Web.com) and shot a 60, including a 27 on the outward nine, in the 2013 Utah Championship. He won three NCAA Division III individual titles (1998, 1999, 2001) as a member of the Methodist College team.
  • Jason Gore, 43, of Valencia, Calif., has competed in four U.S. Opens and played in the final group with Retief Goosen at Pinehurst No. 2 in 2005. Gore, who was a member of the victorious 1997 USA Walker Cup Team, has one PGA Tour and seven Web.com Tour victories.
  • T.J. Howe, 29, of Osceola, Pa., played in his first U.S. Open last year after qualifying through local and sectional play. Howe, who was an All-American at Penn State University, has competed on the Mackenzie Tour-PGA Tour Canada. His favorite team, the Pittsburgh Penguins, has advanced to this year’s Stanley Cup Final.
  • Billy Hurley III, 34, of Annapolis, Md., has played in two U.S. Opens (2014, 2016), finishing in a tie for 48th in 2014. Hurley graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy and was the 2004 Patriot League Player of the Year. He was a member of the winning 2005 USA Walker Cup Team. Hurley rose to the rank of lieutenant and served on U.S. Navy destroyers and cruisers.
  • Nicholas Thompson, 34, of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., has played in three U.S. Opens. He has competed on the PGA Tour and Web.com Tour. His brother, Curtis, also plays on the Web.com Tour. Their sister, Lexi, the 2008 U.S. Girls’ Junior champion, has won eight LPGA titles, including the 2014 Kraft Nabisco.

Canoe Brook Country Club (North & South Courses)
Summit, N.J.; 80 players for 5 spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Christopher Crawford, 23, of Bensalem, Pa., became the first Drexel University golfer to play in a U.S. Open last year. His 40-foot birdie putt on the final hole at the Summit, N.J., sectional qualifier placed him in the field at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. Crawford, who is currently a Drexel assistant coach, has competed in four U.S. Amateurs. A three-time All-America selection, he was voted 2015 Colonial Athletic Association Player of the Year.
  • Matthew Dobyns, 39, of Lake Success, N.Y., is attempting to advance through local and sectional qualifying for the second time in four years. He was the lone club professional to play in the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2, where he missed the cut by one stroke. Dobyns, the head professional at Fresh Meadow Country Club, won the 2012 and 2015 PGA Professional National Championships.
  • Mike Dunham, 45, of Concord, Mass., is the goaltending coach for the NHL’s New York Islanders. Dunham, who competed in the 2007 and 2014 U.S. Mid-Amateurs, was drafted by the New Jersey Devils in 1990 and played for five NHL teams. He also played in three Winter Olympic Games and won a silver medal with Team USA in 2002, in Salt Lake City, Utah. His father, Ron, is the director of golf at Teton Pines Country Club, in Wilson, Wyo.
  • Scott Harvey, 39, of Greensboro, N.C., won the 2014 U.S. Mid-Amateur and was a member of the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team. Harvey, a property manager, was the runner-up to Stewart Hagestad in last year’s U.S. Mid-Amateur and has reached match play in all three U.S. Amateur Four-Balls with partner Todd Mitchell (2015, 2016, 2017).
  • Jim Herman, 39, of Palm City, Fla., has competed in three U.S. Opens (2010, 2013, 2016). He was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, played on the University of Cincinnati golf team, and started his professional career on the Golden Bear Tour in 2001. Herman, who registered his first PGA Tour win in last year’s Shell Houston Open, served as an assistant pro from 2006-07 at Trump National Golf Club, in Bedminster, N.J., the site of the 2017 U.S. Women’s Open.
  • Timothy O’Neal, 44, of Savannah, Ga., has played on the Web.com, PGA Tour Latinoamerica, Asian and eGolf tours. He qualified for his lone U.S. Open in 2015 at Chambers Bay. He was the first African American to win the Georgia State Amateur in 1997. O’Neal played at Jackson State University and was coached by Eddie Payton, whose brother Walter is enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
  • Cody Paladino, 28, of Kensington, Conn., was the runner-up to Colt Knost in the 2007 U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship. Paladino, who owns one PGA Tour Latinoamerica victory, has studied seven languages, including Chinese (Mandarin) and Ancient Greek. He played as a collegian at Baylor, and his brother, Brent, competed at William & Mary.
  • Andy Pope, 33, of Orlando, Fla., is attempting to play in his third consecutive U.S. Open. He was one of six players to make the cut in the 2015 U.S. Open after advancing through both local and sectional qualifying. Pope, who tied for 70th at Chambers Bay, played at Xavier University and has competed primarily on the Web.com Tour since 2012.
  • Nathan Smith, 38, of Pittsburgh, Pa., is a four-time U.S. Mid-Amateur champion who holds the record for the most victories in the championship. He won the 2015 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball title with partner Todd White. Smith, who has played on three USA Walker Cup Teams, works as an investment advisor. He has played in 40 USGA championships, including 16 U.S. Amateurs.
  • Marc Turnesa, 39, of Jupiter, Fla., is the grandson of Mike Turnesa, who tied for 26th in the 1946 U.S. Open and was one of seven brothers who played golf. Marc, who played in the 2011 U.S. Open, has one victory each on the PGA Tour and Web.com Tour. His great uncle, Willie, won the 1938 and 1948 U.S. Amateurs.
  • Cameron Wilson, 24, of Rowayton, Conn., has played in two U.S. Opens, including qualifying through both stages as an amateur in 2012. Wilson, who competes on the Web.com Tour, won the 2014 NCAA Division I individual championship, defeating Ollie Schniederjans of Georgia Tech on the third playoff hole. As a senior at Stanford University, he was a first-team All-American and first-team All-Pac-12 Conference selection. He is ambidextrous but plays golf left-handed. His twin sister, McKenzie, was a member of the Stanford sailing team.

Brookside Golf & Country Club & Lakes Golf & Country Club
Columbus, Ohio; 120 players for TBD spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Ryan Armour, 41, of Silver Lake, Ohio, was the runner-up to Tiger Woods in the 1993 U.S. Junior Amateur. Armour, who won on the Web.com Tour in 2016, held a 2-up lead before Woods birdied holes 17 and 18 and won it with a par on the 19th hole. Armour, who earned All-America honors at Ohio State University, has also played on the PGA Tour.
  • Aaron Baddeley, 36, of Australia, has played in nine U.S. Opens. His best finish was a tie for 13th in 2007 when he was the 54-hole leader at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. Baddeley has won three PGA Tour, two PGA European Tour and four PGA Tour of Australasia events. He was the runner-up to James Oh in the 1998 U.S. Junior Amateur.
  • Derek Bard, 22, of New Hartford, N.Y., was the 2015 U.S. Amateur runner-up, losing to Bryson DeChambeau in the final, and played in last year’s U.S. Open. In 2017, was selected to the All-Atlantic Coast Conference team for the third consecutive year as a member of the University of Virginia squad. He has played in three U.S. Amateurs and two U.S. Junior Amateurs.
  • Ricky Barnes, 36, of Stockton, Calif., won the 2002 U.S. Amateur Championship, defeating Hunter Mahan in the final. He tied for second in the 2009 U.S. Open at Bethpage State Park’s Black Course. He also qualified for the 2000 U.S. Open as a 19-year-old amateur, one of six Opens in which he has competed.
  • Keegan Bradley, 30, of Woodstock, Vt., has competed in five U.S. Opens, including a tie for fourth in 2014 at Pinehurst No. 2. Bradley, who won the 2011 PGA Championship, was an all-state ski racer before concentrating on golf. His father, Mark, is a club professional and his aunt, Pat, is a World Golf Hall of Famer who won 31 LPGA titles, including the 1981 U.S. Women’s Open.
  • Patrick Cantlay, 25, of Long Beach, Calif., was the low amateur in the 2011 U.S. Open when he tied for 21st. Cantlay finished 41st the following year at The Olympic Club. He was sidelined from golf for several years due to injuries and personal tragedy but is back on the PGA Tour in 2017. Cantlay, who lost to Kelly Kraft in the 2011 U.S. Amateur final at Erin Hills, was the Mark H. McCormack Medal recipient as world’s leading amateur and was the nation’s top collegiate golfer at UCLA.
  • K.J. Choi, 47, of the Republic of Korea, has competed in 13 U.S. Opens. His best finish is a tie for 15th in 2005 at Pinehurst No. 2 and in 2012 at The Olympic Club. Choi, a former competitive power weightlifter, has eight PGA Tour wins, including The Players Championship in 2011.
  • Stewart Cink, 44, of Duluth, Ga., has competed in 19 U.S. Opens and has seven top-25 finishes. He was third in 2001 at Southern Hills Country Club, in Tulsa, Okla. Cink won the 2009 Open Championship, conducted by The R&A, in a four-hole aggregate playoff with Tom Watson. He took time off from the PGA Tour last year to care for his wife, Lisa, who was diagnosed with breast cancer. Cink fired rounds of 62-61 to earn medalist honors at the Columbus, Ohio, sectional qualifier in 2003.
  • Erik Compton, 37, of Miami, Fla., was diagnosed with viral cardiomyopathy at age 9 and has since had two successful heart transplants. Compton, a member of the 2001 USA Walker Cup Team, has played in three U.S. Opens. He tied for second at Pinehurst No. 2 in 2014.
  • Ben Curtis, 40, of Kent, Ohio, has played in seven U.S. Opens, with his best finish a tie for 14th in 2010 at Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links. Curtis captured the 2003 Open Championship, conducted by The R&A, in his first start. He has four PGA Tour victories.
  • Bryson DeChambeau, 23, of Clovis, Calif., has qualified for the U.S. Open through the Columbus, Ohio, sectional the last two years. He shot a second-round 63 one year ago in sectionals and went on to tie for 15th at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. In 2015, he became the fifth player to win the U.S. Amateur and NCAA Division I individual championship in the same year, joining Jack Nicklaus, Phil Mickelson, Tiger Woods and Ryan Moore.
  • Luke Donald, 39, of England, qualified for the U.S. Open through sectional play the last two years. Donald has competed in 13 U.S. Opens, with his best finish a tie for eighth in 2013. Donald has won five times on the PGA Tour and seven times on the PGA European Tour, including back-to-back BMW PGA Championships in 2011 and 2012.
  • Joe Durant, 53, of Pensacola, Fla., has competed in seven U.S. Opens, including a tie for 24th in 2001 at Southern Hills Country Club. He has won four PGA Tour events and twice on PGA Tour Champions. Durant, who played at Huntingdon College, won the 1987 NAIA Championship.
  • Gavin Hall, 22, of Pittsford, N.Y., is an All-America and All-Big 12 Conference performer at the University of Texas. The Longhorns won this year’s Big 12 title and advanced to their 11th consecutive NCAA Championship. Hall tied for 11th at NCAAs. He was the youngest player in the 2013 U.S. Open field at Merion Golf Club when he qualified through local and sectional play. Hall has competed in three U.S. Amateurs and advanced to match play last year. He also holds the record for lowest score in U.S. Junior Amateur stroke play, a 62 in the second round in 2010.
  • Morgan Hoffmann, 27, of Jupiter, Fla., has played in four U.S. Opens, including a tie for 27th in 2015 at Chambers Bay. His first event as a professional was the 2012 U.S. Open, where he tied for 29th. Hoffmann was a member of the winning 2009 USA Walker Cup Team.
  • Michael Kim, 22, of Dallas, Texas, was a member of the victorious 2013 USA Walker Cup Team and low amateur in the 2013 U.S. Open, where he tied for 17th. Kim, who was born in Korea but raised in San Diego, Calif., earned the 2013 Jack Nicklaus Award as the nation’s top collegiate player while at the University of California Berkeley. He has six top-25 finishes on the PGA Tour this season.
  • Jason Kokrak, 32, of Charlotte, N.C., advanced to his second U.S. Open by qualifying in the Columbus, Ohio, sectional last year. He tied for 37th at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. Kokrak, who joined the PGA Tour in 2012, won twice on the Nationwide (now Web.com) Tour. He was the stroke-play medalist in the 2007 U.S. Amateur and reached the Round of 16 in match play.
  • Kelly Kraft, 28, of Dallas, Texas, is attempting to qualify for his first U.S. Open. Kraft won the 2011 U.S. Amateur by defeating Patrick Cantlay, 2 up, in the final at Erin Hills. He forfeited his exemption into the 2012 U.S. Open as Amateur champion by turning professional following that year’s Masters Tournament. He was a member of the 2011 USA Walker Cup Team.
  • Tom Lehman, 58, of Scottsdale, Ariz., has played in 18 U.S. Opens and tied for second in 1996 at Oakland Hills Country Club. Lehman owns five PGA Tour victories, including the 1996 Open Championship, held at Royal Lytham & St. Annes Golf Club. He has won 10 PGA Tour Champions events, including three senior major titles.
Tom Lehman will attempt to qualify for his 19th U.S. Open when he tees it up in Columbus, Ohio. (USGA/Fred Vuich)
  • Davis Love III, 53, of Sea Island, Ga., has played in 23 U.S. Opens and owns five top-10 finishes, including a tie for second in 1996. Love has 21 PGA Tour wins, including the 1997 PGA Championship. He served as United States captain for the 2012 and 2016 Ryder Cup Matches. His son, Davis IV, is competing in the Ball Ground, Ga., sectional.
  • Jamie Lovemark, 29, of San Diego, Calif., played in his lone U.S. Open in 2015 when he advanced through the Purchase, N.Y., sectional qualifier. He tied for 18th at Chambers Bay. Lovemark has five top-25 finishes on the PGA Tour this season. In 2007, Lovemark won the NCAA individual title and was a member of the USA Walker Cup Team.
  • Curtis Luck, 20, of Australia, won the 2016 U.S. Amateur by defeating Brad Dalke, 6 and 4, in the final. He became the third Australian to win the Amateur, joining Walter J. Travis and Nick Flanagan. Luck, who turned professional after competing in the 2017 Masters, helped Australia win the 2016 World Amateur Team Championship and won last year’s Asia-Pacific Amateur and Western Australian Open.
  • Billy Mayfair, 50, of Scottsdale, Ariz., has played in 14 U.S. Opens, with his best finish a tie for fifth in 2002 at Bethpage State Park’s Black Course. Mayfair won the 1987 U.S. Amateur and 1986 U.S. Amateur Public Links, becoming the first player to win both titles. He tied for second in the 2016 U.S. Senior Open in his first year of eligibility for the championship.
  • Geoff Ogilvy, 39, of Australia, won the 2006 U.S. Open at Winged Foot Golf Club, in Mamaroneck, N.Y., by one stroke over Jim Furyk, Colin Montgomerie and Phil Mickelson. He has competed in 13 U.S. Opens. Ogilvy, who has at least a top-6 finish in all four professional major championships, won the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship in 2006 and 2009.
  • Rod Pampling, 47, of Australia, has played in eight U.S. Opens, with his best finish a tie for 14th at Torrey Pines Golf Course in 2008. He advanced to the 2014 U.S. Open through the Columbus, Ohio, sectional qualifier with rounds of 73 and 65. His wife, Angela, is a clinical psychologist.
  • Cheng-Tsung Pan, 25, of Chinese Taipei, has played in three U.S. Opens, including a tie for 45th in 2013. He also tied for 64th in 2015 at Chambers Bay when he qualified through both stages. Pan, an All-America player at the University of Washington, competed in the 2014 Open Championship at Royal Liverpool Golf Club. In 2007, he became the youngest U.S. Amateur quarterfinalist since Bob Jones at the age of 15. Pan played in seven U.S. Amateurs.
  • Kyle Reifers, 33, of Mooresville, N.C., was born in Columbus, Ohio and attended Bishop Watterson High School. Reifers, who played as a collegian at Wake Forest, was a member of the 2005 USA Walker Cup Team. His father, Randy, is an Ohio Golf Hall of Fame inductee who played at DePauw University with former Vice President Dan Quayle and NBC/Golf Channel analyst Mark Rolfing.
  • Patrick Rodgers, 24, of Avon, Ind., qualified for his first U.S. Open through the Columbus, Ohio, sectional last year. He tied for 46th at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. Rodgers, an All-American at Stanford University, was a member of two USA Walker Cup Teams (2011, 2013) and played in three U.S. Amateurs and two U.S. Junior Amateurs. He was a quarterfinalist in the 2011 U.S. Amateur, held at Erin Hills.
  • Sam Saunders, 29, of St. Augustine, Fla., is the grandson of 1960 U.S. Open champion Arnold Palmer. In 2015, Saunders was co-medalist in the Columbus, Ohio, sectional qualifier and tied for 50th in the U.S. Open. He also played in the 2011 U.S. Open at Congressional Country Club.
  • Scottie Scheffler, 20, of Dallas, Texas, earned first-team All-Big 12 Conference honors and helped the University of Texas win this year’s Big 12 Championship and place second in the NCAA Austin Regional. He tied for third at the NCAA Championship. Scheffler, who won the 2013 U.S. Junior Amateur and qualified for his first U.S. Open last year, has competed in 10 USGA championships and reached match play in last year’s U.S. Amateur.
  • Ollie Schniederjans, 23, of Alpharetta, Ga., has four top-10 finishes on the PGA Tour this season. He won the Web.com Tour’s Air Capital Classic last year. Schniederjans was a three-time All-American and two-time Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year at Georgia Tech. In 2014, he won the Mark H. McCormack Medal as the world’s top amateur. He tied for 42nd in the 2015 U.S. Open at Chambers Bay.
  • Vijay Singh, 54, of Fiji, has played in 18 U.S. Opens and has seven top-10 finishes. His best finish was a tie for third at Pinehurst No. 2 in 1999. Singh, who has won one Masters Tournament and two PGA Championships, tied for 18th in his second U.S. Senior Open at Scioto Country Club, in Columbus, Ohio, last year.
  • Richard Todd, 31, of Milwaukee, Wis., is in his first year as assistant golf coach at Marquette University. He played at the University at Alabama (2005-08), where he was a first-team All-Southeastern Conference selection and competed in two NCAA Tournaments. His father, Richard, was a standout Alabama quarterback for coach Bear Bryant in the early 1970s and a longtime starter for the New York Jets.
  • Kevin Tway, 28, of Edmond, Okla., won the 2005 U.S. Junior Amateur Championship. He has competed in three U.S. Opens and tied for 60th at Pinehurst No. 2 in 2014. Tway, an All-America player at Oklahoma State University, is the son of 1986 PGA champion Bob Tway, who played in 18 U.S. Opens and tied for third in 1998.
  • Harold Varner, 26, of Charlotte, N.C., qualified for his lone U.S. Open in 2013 through the local and sectional stages. He has played on the Web.com Tour but posted his first professional victory at the 2016 Australian PGA Championship. He is the second American to win the championship, joining three-time U.S. Open champion Hale Irwin (1978).
  • Camilo Villegas, 35, of Colombia, has played in eight U.S. Opens, with his best finish a tie for ninth in 2008. Villegas has won four times on the PGA Tour, including the 2008 Tour Championship. He was the runner-up to Hunter Mahan in the 1999 U.S. Junior Amateur.
Davis Love III has posted five top-10 finishes in the U.S. Open. (USGA/Fred Vuich)

Springfield Country Club
Springfield, Ohio; 77 players for 4 spots (Scoring/Tee Times)

  • Zac Blair, 26, of St. George, Utah, qualified for his lone U.S. Open through both local and sectional play. He tied for 40th at Pinehurst No. 2 in 2014. Blair, an All-America player at Brigham Young University, has two top-15 finishes on the PGA Tour this season.
  • Chandler Blanchet, 21, of Pensacola, Fla., carded a 1-under-par 209 for 54 holes to win the 2017 NCAA Division II individual championship. Blanchet, a junior on the University of West Florida team, made up a three-stroke deficit over the closing holes. Blanchet, a first-team All-American, was chosen the Gulf South Conference’s top player for the second consecutive year. He also was the conference tournament’s medalist for the second year in a row.
  • Nick Carlson, 19, of Hamilton, Mich., advanced to the semifinals of the 2016 U.S. Amateur where he lost to eventual champion Curtis Luck in 21 holes. Carlson, a sophomore on the University of Michigan team, tied for 16th in this year’s Big Ten Conference Championship and tied for 17th in the NCAA Washington Regional.
  • Corey Conners, 25, of Canada, was the 2014 U.S. Amateur runner-up to Gunn Yang at Atlanta Athletic Club. Conners, who played in three U.S. Amateurs and reached the quarterfinals in 2013, has two top-10 finishes on the Web.com Tour this year. He competed on PGA Tour Latinoamerica in 2016 and was the medalist in qualifying school.
  • Charlie Danielson, 23, of Osceola, Wis., advanced through the Mendota Heights, Minn., local qualifier. Danielson, who competed in his first U.S. Open last year at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club, was chosen 2016 Big Ten Conference Player of the Year. Danielson, a three-time All-America selection at the University of Illinois, has competed in three U.S. Amateurs and reached match play at the 2014 U.S. Amateur Public Links.
  • Tony Finau, 27, of Lehi, Utah, advanced through the Springfield, Ohio, sectional qualifier the last two years. He tied for 14th in his first U.S. Open at Chambers Bay in 2015. Finau, who is of Tongan and American Samoan descent, won for the first time on the PGA Tour in a playoff for the 2016 Puerto Rico Open title. He is the cousin of Milwaukee Bucks’ forward Jabari Parker.
  • Doug Ghim, 21, of Arlington Heights, Ill., was chosen 2017 Big 12 Conference Player of the Year as a member of the University of Texas team. He helped the Longhorns win the Big 12 and finish second at the NCAA Austin Regional. Ghim was the 2014 U.S. Amateur Public Links runner-up to Byron Meth and advanced to the Round of 32 at last year’s U.S. Amateur.
  • Austin Greaser, 16, of Vandalia, Ohio, survived a 9-for-4 playoff in local qualifying when he birdied the first hole at Kearney Hills Golf Club, in Lexington, Ky. Greaser, a sophomore on the Vandalia-Butler High team, made birdies on holes 17 and 18 to shoot a 1-under 71 and get into the playoff. He lives 26 miles from Springfield Country Club.
  • Kevin Hall, 34, of Cincinnati, Ohio, has been deaf since age 2 due to a bout with meningitis. He attended St. Rita School for the Deaf and started playing golf at age 9. He won the 2004 Big Ten Conference championship and led Ohio State University to the team title. Hall is playing on mini-tours, including the SwingThought and Advocates pro golf tours. He competed in his first PGA Tour event since 2008 in February, when he received the Genesis Open’s Charlie Sifford Memorial Exemption.
  • Nick Hardy, 21, of Northbrook, Ill., was chosen first-team All-Big Ten Conference and helped the University of Illinois make its 10th consecutive NCAA Tournament appearance. He was the medalist at the Springfield, Ohio, sectional qualifier last year. He has played in two U.S. Opens, tying for 52nd in 2015 at Chambers Bay. He has competed in four U.S. Amateurs and two U.S. Junior Amateurs.
  • Luke Kluver, 16, of Norfolk, Neb., is believed to be the first Nebraska high school golfer to reach U.S. Open sectional qualifying since Tom Sieckmann in 1972. Kluver (who will turn 17 on June 3) won the 2016 NSAA Class A state title by making a 15-foot birdie putt on the first playoff hole. His mother, Michelle, was All-Big Eight Conference and an NCAA regional qualifier for the University of Nebraska (1993-96).
  • Dylan Meyer, 21, of Evansville, Ind., reached the quarterfinals of the 2016 U.S. Amateur and won last year’s Western Amateur. Meyer, the 2017 Big Ten Conference Player of the Year, helped Illinois win its third consecutive conference championship and make its 10th straight NCAA appearance. He won the Big Ten individual title, which included a course-record 63 in the first round, and tied for sixth at NCAAs.
  • Sammy Schmitz, 36, of Farmington, Minn., won the 2015 U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship and earned an invitation to the 2016 Masters. Schmitz recorded the second known ace on a par 4 in USGA championship history when he holed his tee shot on No. 15 at John’s Island Club’s West Course in the championship match. He works for a health-care services company.
  • Patrick Wilkes-Krier, 33, of Ann Arbor, Mich., qualified for last year’s U.S. Open through the Springfield, Ohio, sectional. He was one of 27 players to advance through both qualifying stages. Wilkes-Krier is in his first year as an assistant golf coach at the University of Michigan. He had been an instructor for a local golf academy’s elite junior program.
     

Germantown Country Club & Ridgeway Country Club
Memphis, Tenn.; 108 players for TBD spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Stuart Appleby, 46, of Australia, has played in 14 U.S. Opens, including a tie for 10th in 1998 at The Olympic Club. Appleby, who grew up on a dairy farm, owns nine PGA Tour and three PGA Tour of Australasia victories.
  • Sam Burns, 20, of Shreveport, La., was voted 2017 Southeastern Conference Player of the Year and helped Louisiana State University win the NCAA Baton Rouge Regional. Burns, who was a first-team All-SEC selection, won the individual regional title. Burns qualified for his first U.S. Open last year and advanced to the Round of 32 in the U.S. Amateur. He won three consecutive Louisiana state high school championships.
  • Bubba Dickerson, 36, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., is attempting to qualify for his second U.S. Open after having played in 2011 at Congressional Country Club. He won the 2001 U.S. Amateur, defeating Robert Hamilton, 1 up, but gave up his 2002 U.S. Open exemption to turn professional. He also was the runner-up to D.J. Trahan in the 2000 U.S. Amateur Public Links.
  • Retief Goosen, 48, of South Africa, won the U.S. Open in 2001 (playoff with Mark Brooks) and 2004 (by two strokes over Phil Mickelson). Goosen, who was struck by lightning as an amateur, has seven wins on the PGA Tour and 14 victories on the PGA European Tour. He has played in 18 U.S. Opens and received a special exemption into the field last year at Oakmont, where he missed the cut.
  • Cody Gribble, 26, of Dallas, Texas, has played in two U.S. Opens (2014, 2015). He advanced through local and sectional qualifying to Pinehurst No. 2, where he tied for 21st. He was one of five local and sectional qualifiers to make the cut. Gribble, an All-America player at the University of Texas, posted his first PGA Tour victory (Sanderson Farms Championship) last October.
  • J.J. Henry, 42, of Fort Worth, Texas, advanced to last year’s U.S. Open through the Memphis, Tenn., sectional qualifier with rounds of 67-68. He has played in eight U.S. Opens and his best finish was a tie for 26th in 2007. Henry has registered three PGA Tour victories, including the 2015 Barracuda Championship, and played in the 2006 Ryder Cup Matches.
  • Andrew Landry, 29, of Dripping Springs, Texas, tied for 15th in his first U.S. Open last year at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. Landry, who held the first-round lead and played in the final group with Shane Lowry on Sunday, qualified through both stages. An All-American at the University of Arkansas, Landry has won twice on the Web.com Tour.
  • Spencer Levin, 32, of Roseville, Calif., qualified for his fourth U.S. Open last year through the Columbus, Ohio, sectional. He tied for 65th at Oakmont. Levin, who has won three times on the Canadian Tour, tied for 13th as an amateur in the 2004 U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills.
  • Ian Poulter, 41, of England, has played in 12 U.S. Opens. His best finish is a tie for 12th in 2006. Poulter, who owns 12 PGA European Tour victories, has been a member of four winning European Ryder Cup teams. He tied for second in the 2017 Players Championship.
  • Chez Reavie, 35, of Scottsdale, Ariz., claimed the 2001 U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship by defeating Danny Green in 38 holes. He has played in four U.S. Opens. As a PGA Tour rookie, Reavie won the 2008 Canadian Open. In 2015, he was victorious for the first time in seven years by capturing on the Web.com Tour’s Small Business Connection Championship.
  • Davis Riley, 20, of Hattiesburg, Miss., has competed in eight USGA championships, including the 2015 U.S. Open. He was the runner-up in the 2013 and 2014 U.S. Junior Amateurs and reached the Round of 32 in last year’s U.S. Amateur. Riley, a sophomore at the University of Alabama, earned second-team All-Southeastern Conference honors in 2017.
  • Steve Stricker, 50, of Madison, Wis., has played in 19 U.S. Opens and has 11 top-25 finishes. Stricker, who was born in Edgerton, Wis., 63 miles from Erin Hills, finished fifth in both 1998 and 1999. He has 12 PGA Tour victories. Stricker was an All-American at the University of Illinois before starting his pro career on the Canadian Professional Golf Tour in 1990. He is fully exempt to play in his first U.S. Senior Open in late June.
Steve Stricker, a veteran of 19 U.S. Opens, is trying to earn a spot in the first one to be played in his home state. (USGA/Steven Gibbons)
  • Braden Thornberry, 20, of Olive Branch, Miss., won the 2017 NCAA Division I individual title by four strokes with a 72-hole score of 11-under 277. He earned first-team All-Southeastern Conference recognition as a sophomore at the University of Mississippi. He tied for third in the SEC Championship and finished fourth at the NCAA Austin Regional. Thornberry, who won the Jones Cup Invitational in February, will play in the PGA Tour’s FedEx St. Jude Classic.
  • Mark Wilson, 42, of Elmhurst, Ill., has competed in four U.S. Opens. He was born in Menomonee Falls, Wis., 19 miles from Erin Hills. Wilson owns five PGA Tour wins. He was the runner-up to Tiger Woods in the 1992 U.S. Junior Amateur.
  • Casey Wittenberg, 32, of Memphis, Tenn., has played in seven U.S. Opens and tied for 10th in 2012 at The Olympic Club. He posted his third Web.com Tour victory in March 2017 and was chosen the Web.com Player of the Year in 2012. Wittenberg, the 2003 U.S. Amateur runner-up, advanced through the Memphis, Tenn., sectional in 2014, which included a first-round 62.
     

Lakewood Country Club
Dallas, Texas, 58 players for 3 spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Woody Austin, 53, of Derby, Kan., has competed in 14 USGA championships, including seven U.S. Opens and three U.S. Senior Opens. His best finish in a U.S. Open was a tie for 23rd in 1996. Austin won three PGA Tour Champions tournaments during the spring of 2016.
  • Philip Barbaree, 18, of Shreveport, La., won the 2015 U.S. Junior Amateur by defeating Andrew Orischak in 37 holes. Barbaree set a championship record for largest comeback, coming from 5 down with eight holes to play. As a freshman, Barbaree helped Louisiana State University win its first ever NCAA regional championship. He was chosen 2015 Rolex Junior Player of the Year after winning the AJGA Rolex Tournament of Champions.
  • Bob Estes, 51, of Austin, Texas, has competed in 15 U.S. Opens. His best finish is a tie for 11th in 2005 at Pinehurst No. 2. Estes, who has won four times on the PGA Tour, is fully exempt to play in his first U.S. Senior Open in late June at Salem Country Club.
  • Noah Goodwin, 16, of Corinth, Texas, was the runner-up to Min Woo Lee in the 2016 U.S. Junior Amateur Championship. He advanced to match play in the 2015 and 2016 U.S. Amateurs. Goodwin, one of six 16-year-olds in 2017 U.S. Open sectional qualifying, has the same swing coach (Cameron McCormick) as 2015 U.S. Open champion Jordan Spieth. His father, Jeff, is a professor of kinesiology at the University of North Texas.
  • Cole Hammer, 17, of Houston, Texas, was the third-youngest player to compete in the U.S. Open when he played at Chambers Bay in 2015. He advanced to the Round of 16 in last year’s U.S. Junior Amateur and reached match play in the 2015 U.S. Amateur. Hammer, who was chosen 2016 Southern Texas PGA Amateur of the Year and had elbow surgery last fall, tied for second in the Azalea Invitational on April 2.
  • Hunter Mahan, 35, of Dallas, Texas, has competed in 10 U.S. Opens and tied for fourth in 2013. He has recorded six PGA Tour victories. Mahan won the 1999 U.S. Junior Amateur by defeating Camilo Villegas, 4 and 2, and was the runner-up to Ricky Barnes in the 2002 U.S. Amateur.
Hunter Mahan went right down to the wire in his run at Merion Golf Club in 2013. (USGA/Fred Vuich)
  • Mike McCoy, 54, of Des Moines, Iowa, has played in 50 USGA championships. He was the low amateur in the 2014 and 2015 U.S. Senior Opens and won the 2013 U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship, the second-oldest winner. McCoy, who was a member of the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team, is scheduled to compete in his fifth consecutive U.S. Senior Open in June.
  • Ryan Palmer, 40, has played in six U.S. Opens, including a tie for 21st in 2011 at Congressional Country Club. Palmer, who spent three years competing on mini-tours, has won three PGA Tour and one Nationwide Tour (now Web.com) events. He recently took time off from professional golf to assist his wife who is battling breast cancer.
  • Martin Piller, 31, of Duncanville, Texas, is married to LPGA Tour player Gerina Piller. Martin has registered five Web.com Tour victories and won twice in the summer of 2015. Gerina has played in five U.S. Women’s Opens, including a tie for eighth at CordeValle last year.
  • Shuai Ming Wong, 17, of the People’s Republic of China, captured the 2017 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball with Frankie Capan on May 31 on Pinehurst No. 2, rallying to defeat Clark Collier and Kyle Hudelson, 2 and 1, in the final match. Wong reached the Round of 32 in the 2016 U.S. Junior Amateur, and he also qualified for last year’s U.S. Amateur. Wong, a junior at The John Cooper School, was born in Hong Kong but moved to Beijing at age 6. In 2015, Wong, whose nickname is Ben, won the Shell Houston Open Junior Championship by 12 strokes.
  • Will Zalatoris, 20, of Plano, Texas, was chosen 2017 Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year, competing for Wake Forest University. Zalatoris, a junior, tied for fifth at the NCAA Austin Regional to qualify for the NCAA Championship as an individual. Zalatoris won the 2014 U.S. Junior Amateur and reached match play in the last three U.S. Amateurs (2014, Round of 16; 2015, Round of 32; 2016, Round of 64).

Tacoma Country & Golf Club
Lakewood, Wash.; 70 players for 4 spots (Tee Times/Scoring)

  • Brett Coletta, 20, of Australia, was the 2015 U.S. Amateur stroke-play medalist and the runner-up to Curtis Luck at last year’s Asia-Pacific Amateur. He also won the Queensland Open as an amateur which gave him full status on the PGA Tour of Australasia. He turned professional at the SMBC Singapore Open in January 2017 and followed with his first PGA Tour start at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am.
  • Tadd Fujikawa, 26, of Honolulu, Hawaii, was the youngest (age 15) to play in a U.S. Open when he qualified to played at Winged Foot Golf Club through both local and sectional play in 2006. At age 16 years and 4 days, he made the 36-hole cut at the Sony Open, the second-youngest player at the time to make the cut in a PGA Tour event. Fujikawa was born three months premature and doctors gave him a 50-50 chance of survival.
  • Lee McCoy, 23, of Jupiter, Fla., was sidelined from the PGA Tour for two months following a minor auto accident in November 2016. McCoy was a member of the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team. In 2016, he was chosen Southeastern Conference Player of the Year when he led the University of Georgia to the SEC and NCAA regional championships. He tied for sixth at the NCAA Championship. McCoy, who played in the 2015 U.S. Open at Chambers Bay, has competed in two U.S. Amateurs and two U.S. Junior Amateurs.
  • Tyler McCumber, 28, of Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., considers himself a surfing thrill-seeker. He rode 15-foot waves in Puerto Rico, following his philosophy: "If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much room." He is the son of Mark McCumber, who tied for second with Chip Beck and Ian Woosnam behind Curtis Strange in the 1989 U.S. Open. McCumber, who competed in 13 U.S. Opens, won 10 PGA Tour titles.
  • Jordan Niebrugge, 23, of Mequon, Wis., advanced through the Sheboygan Falls, Wis., local qualifier by carding a 3-under 33 on the inward nine. Niebrugge won the silver medal as the low amateur (tied for 6th) in the 2016 Open Championship at St. Andrews. Niebrugge, who has played in three U.S. Amateurs, won the 2013 U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship and was a member of the 2013 and 2015 USA Walker Cup Teams. He was an All-America and All-Big 12 Conference selection at Oklahoma State University.
  • Robert Shelton IV, 21, of Wilmer, Ala., earned medalist honors in Q-School for the Mackenzie Tour-PGA Tour Canada in April. He competed in his lone U.S. Open in 2014 after advancing through sectional qualifying. He was a member of the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team. Shelton was a three-time All-Southeastern Conference player for the University of Alabama.
  • Hunter Stewart, 24, of Nicholasville, Ky., posted the lowest score in 2017 U.S. Open local qualifying with a 10-under 62 at Jackson (Tenn.) Country Club. Stewart, who made two eagles during the round, was a member of the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team. An All-American at Vanderbilt University who competed in four U.S. Amateurs, Stewart played in the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2.
  • Aaron Wise, 20, of Lake Elsinore, Calif., played in his first U.S. Open last year after qualifying through local and sectional play. As a first-team All-Pac-12 Conference player at the University of Oregon, Wise won the 2016 NCAA individual championship. Wise, who competed in four consecutive U.S. Amateurs, from 2012-15, was born in South Africa.